The reason a 99 ice cream is called a 99 has nothing to do with the price

The 99 ice cream is a crucial part of British culture. It is the nation’s favourite summer time treat, with a wealth of nostalgic memories attached to it. But have you ever wondered how the popular ice cream actually got its name?

99 ice cream
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While there are plenty of rumours for where it came from, the most common one is of course, that it is because the vanilla ice cream cone with the Cadbury’s chocolate flake is priced at 99p (or at least was at one point, because let’s face it, that’s definitely not the case today).

However, while we hate to break it to you, that theory is actually a myth. The classic ice cream was actually first introduced back in the late 1920s or 1930, which was way before we were using pence in Britain. And if we were, 99p would equate to around £43 at the time which may be a tad overpriced for an ice cream. So, where did the name really come from?

Well, according to Sarah Foden from the Cadbury archives, the name has a special meaning. Speaking to Metro, she said: ‘The real reason for the name of the Flake 99 has been lost in the mists of time, however the best piece of evidence we have of its origins comes from a Cadbury works paper.’

99 ice cream
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‘The paper states that in 1928 some of the Italian soft ice cream makers in County Durham were trying to think of ways of introducing other lines to increase their sales and as a result, created the Flake 99,’ she explained.

‘In the days of the monarchy in Italy the King has a specially chosen guard consisting of 99 men, and subsequently anything really special or first class was known as ’99’ – and that his how ’99’ Flake came by its name.’

Well who would have thought, eh?