These are the three things you should never do at a wedding

If there’s anyone who can dish out advice on how to behave ‘properly’ in different social settings – a wedding, for example – it is an etiquette expert. That’s why we were all ears when Diane Gottsman, who specialises in all things proper protocol, revealed the the three most significant things you should never do when attending your loved ones’ big day.

things you should never do at a wedding
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Speaking to The Independent, Gottsman revealed that there are some traditions that should never be ignored by wedding guests. Firstly, and probably most obviously, you should never wear white to someone else’s wedding, whether you’re a man or a woman. It’s strictly for the bride.

‘White is still reserved for the bride,’ Gottsman told the publication. ‘A guest should select another colour and there are plenty of beautiful options when it comes to picking out a great wedding outfit.’

things you should never do at a wedding
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Secondly, do not, and we repeat, do not bring children to the wedding if the invite says it is an adults-only event. We’ve all heard of those parents who bring their children to weddings despite a strict warning that it is a kid-free zone, and according to Gottsman, that’s another of the biggest no-nos on the list.

‘Guests should honour the request,’ she said. ‘However, parents can opt to pass on the wedding if it causes issues. The bride and groom should be prepared for the circumstances without getting their feelings hurt.’

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Finally, do not steal the bride and groom’s thunder by proposing to your other half at someone else’s wedding – especially without consulting them first. The celebration should be reserved for the bride and groom, Gottsman adds, and anyone else’s special moment, ‘unless agreed-upon by the bride and groom in advance, should wait for another time.’

Of course, you might think – but judging from the amount of viral wedding proposal videos that often circulate online, not everyone follows these unspoken rules. So for any traditionalists amongst us, they may well bear repeating.