The Queen will no longer use real fur in her wardrobe

Any outfit fit for a queen will always be made of the finest materials – and from now on, Queen Elizabeth II will add faux fur to that list.

Royal dresser Angela Kelly, who has worked with the monarch for 25 years, has revealed that any new additions to the royal wardrobe will eschew real fur in favour of a faux alternative.

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‘If Her Majesty is due to attend an engagement in particularly cold weather, from 2019 onwards fake fur will be used to make sure she stays warm,’ Kelly reveals in her new book, The Other Side of the Coin: The Queen, the Dresser and the Wardrobe.

A Buckingham Palace representative also confirmed to The Daily Telegraph: ‘As new outfits are designed for the Queen, any fur used will be fake.’ However, the Queen will continue to wear existing items with accents of real fur, including ceremonial robes.

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Fur has long been a staple feature in her fashion for formal engagements, from coats and hats to stoles and trimmed capes and even accents on the Crown Jewels.

But Claire Bass, executive director of Humane Society International said that the latest change in direction reflects the views of a nation as a whole, ‘the vast majority of whom detest cruel fur, and want nothing to do with it.’

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“Our Head of State going fur-free sends a powerful message that fur is firmly out of fashion and does not belong with Brand Britain.’ she told the paper. ‘The UK banned fur farming almost two decades ago because it was deemed too cruel, now we must finish the job and ban fur sales too.’

The decision is thought to make the Queen the first member of the royal family to publicly renounce the use of real fur.

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Camilla, the Duchess of Cornwall has faced backlash for wearing fur in the past, while Kate Middleton has been pictured wearing a real alpaca fur hat made from animals who died of natural causes. Meghan Markle, however, has never been publicly pictured wearing fur.

Representatives from PETA echoed the Humane Society’s comments on the Queen’s decision, saying: ‘This new policy is a sign of the times, as 95 per cent of the British public would also refuse to wear real fur.’