The best money-saving Instagram accounts to follow

Managing your money can help you embrace your power…but it can also be deeply stressful. With so many resources out there, where do you start? There’s only so many times we can read the same advice about giving up our daily takeaway coffee, after all. That’s why many have turned to Instagram for a host of practical, relatable and passionate women who are sharing money-saving and management tips that we can all incorporate into our everyday lives. Here are our favourites…

Best money-saving accounts on Instagram

@myfrugalyear

Starting off as an anonymous blog about getting out of £27,000 worth of debt, Clare Seal, now gives money management advice to her 85,000 followers. She also speaks about the impact of ADHD on her money management skills, and recently has released a book around financial wellbeing. Clare is known for discussing the more hard-hitting, realistic side of money, and how you can learn to manage your relationship with it. Read some of Clare’s money-saving tips here.

@thewealthcheck

Award-winning financial expert Makala Green is determined to demystify financial planning to make it accessible for all – regardless of your background. On Instagram, that translates into everything from jargon-free advice on your self-assessment tax return to explaining how Bank of England base rate changes actually impact us. Essentially, it’s all the confusing stuff about personal finances made simple. Phew! Read some of Makala’s money-saving tips here.

@moneymumofficial

To her 230,000 Instagram followers 40-year-old Gemma Bird from Essex is Money Mum, an oracle of money-saving tips, preaching the power of scrimping and saving. Dubbed the Mrs Hinch of money, and every bit as glamorous, mum-of-two Gemma has turned her obsession with saving into her personal brand, sharing discounts, deals and bargains with her budget-conscious followers. Read our interview with Gemma here.

@penniestopoundspod

This instagram account is so friendly, you won’t even realise you’re learning about money! Colourful and easy to read infographics have everything from savings targets, to hacks around what accounts will be doing the best for your money, and there are loads of free resources and articles to learn about everything from tax ISA’s to how to save for your first house deposit.

@farnooshtorabi

Farnoosh Torabi is the editor at CNN Money by day, and…somehow, also by day, runs an instagram account where she shares money hacks, and opinions about how to make the most of your finances. If you’re more into in depth talks and articles, as opposed to short instagram posts, this account may be for you. Her content has a great feminist slant, which really makes it engaging and accessible for women out there trying to figure money out.

@herfirst100k 

Tori Dunlap has fresh, fun content that focuses on debt and money investment, but she also has a keen passion for career growth – especially asking for a raise! With over two million fans on TikTok, she posts lots of reels, from job tips to snappy comebacks to critics, and there’s a good chance you’ll learn something new about how to invest your money for the best results.

@thriftylondoner

If you live in London then it will not have escaped you that the capital is the most expensive part of the UK, which is why following Laura – aka Thrifty Londoner – is a great shout. From saving money on Tube fares to discount West End tickets, she’s got plenty of fabulous ideas. In fact, even if you don’t live in London, she’s got loads of excellent money advice on this super-accessible account. Read some of Laura’s money-saving tips here.

@myfabfinance 

Tonya Rapley is on a mission to ‘help 100,000 people make money decisions they’re proud of. Every week she posts a ‘Sunday reset’ where you can create a goal for the week, regardless of the week before, and her instagram has a great air of community to it, as well as easy infographics to share to friends also looking to work on their finance journey.  Tonya also has a penchant for joining in with meme trends, and understanding how hard it can be to crack finance language, which always brightens up the feed.