You may now have to re-think your liquid allowance when flying

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There’s many grating things about heading off to the airport to go on holiday.

There’s how long it takes to actually get to the airport, the fact you have to be there two hours before and then, security – the most annoying of them all. Why? Because of the liquid rule whereby all of your toiletries have to be 100ml or under and all fit into a teeny, tiny plastic sandwich bag.

It never gets easier to streamline the holiday cosmetic kit, does it?

Luckily, this rigmarole may soon become a thing of the past.

Currently, 3D scanners that work as explosive detectors, are being trialed in various airports around the world, meaning flyers will no longer have to remove liquids and laptops from their carry-on bags.

The 3D scanners are actually already used to monitor what is inside hold baggage, but they are being trialled for cabin bags at three airports – London’s Heathrow Airport, New York’s JFK and Amsterdam’s Schipol, as well as two air hubs in Boston and Baltimore, USA.  

The machines, which are said to be worth £199,000 each, will be tested in these locations for 12-months to see if they are suitable to roll out across worldwide airport security.

A Heathrow spokesman told MailOnline: ‘We continue to look at new technologies that can both improve the passenger experience and strengthen our security.’

The global aviation ban on bringing liquids over 100ml in carry-on baggage was introduced practically overnight in 2006 after officials revealed that they had uncovered a terror plot to blow up 10 transatlantic planes from Heathrow to North America, which would have killed more people than 9/11.

The plan, which became known as the ‘Liquid Bomb Plot’, would have seen the terrorists transport the ingredients for an improvised explosive onto each aircraft where they would have assembled the bomb before detonating it. The explosive ingredients, derived from hydrogen peroxide, was to be disguised and carried in bottles of Lucozade and Oasis. The perpetrators were later jailed for conspiracy to murder.