Gwyneth Paltrow says this is why she and Chris Martin still get on so well

It was one of the biggest headlines of 2014 – Gwyneth Paltrow and Chris Martin announced their amicable split, in a statement declaring their ‘conscious uncoupling’ and their intentions to remain ‘parents first and foremost, to two incredibly wonderful children’.

Now remarried to screenwriter and producer Brad Falchuk, the actress and entrepreneur still has a healthy, happy relationship with her ex-husband – and in a new interview with ES Magazine, she’s opened up about the choices that made that possible.

Getty Images

‘[Chris] is a very close friend; I see him every day, I talk to him every day,’ she said. ‘And it was very difficult, but I think you see in the children that they got through it, so I am proud of us, I really am. We kept to our commitment that we would put the children first.’

‘Family structure can be reinvented and divorce doesn’t have to be devastating,’ she continued.  ‘It doesn’t have to be the end of your relationship with somebody. I think Chris and I were meant to be together and have our kids. But our relationship is much better like this: friends and co-parents and family.’

Getty Images

Gwyneth and Chris still spend a lot of time together, having shared snaps from group holidays with their children Apple, 14, and Moses, 12, and with Gwyneth even revealing that she still hangs a stocking for him on her fireplace at Christmas.

But initially the couple kept news of their separation quiet for a year before revealing it to the public, taking the time to ‘ask adult friends with divorced parents what they remembered’ about their own family break-ups.

‘There was this resounding theme: “It was really hard because for the first two years my parents didn’t speak.” “It was awful for a while,” or “My parents hated each other”,’ Gwyneth recalled to ES. ‘And I thought, “I would really love to skip that part.” Those kids felt they were constantly betraying one parent by being with the other.’

‘I think we’ve managed to really stay a family.’