This gorgeous Greek island will offer you £450 a month to live there

If you’re sick of the hustle and bustle of city life, then pack your bags because we’ve got an offer you may find very hard to refuse. A beautiful Greek island is paying families €500 (£450) a month to live there.

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That’s right, you can actually get paid to live there – and not because it is a horrible place to be. In fact, it’s quite the opposite. The ‘unspoiled’ island of Antikythira is located between Crete and Kythira and by the looks of things, it is an absolute paradise.

However, it is in dire need of residents to boost its population which is why the Diocese of Kythira and Monemvasia, alongside the municipality and the local community, have decided to offer families £450 a month to live there in order to revive the Island.

As reported by iefimerida.gr, the president of the island, Andreas Harhalakis, said: ‘Our place is very beautiful but difficult during the winter months. We are looking for many families to revive our island.’

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He added: ‘We need three young families, large enough to make Antikythira alive and full of children’s voices. As it was four decades ago when I was going to school. Then on the island lived about 300 people.’

According to the Island’s official website, the population of Antikythira is so small that you are almost guaranteed to meet everyone on your first visit. And when we say small, we mean small. It is home to only 24 permanent residents, though this tends to slightly increase in the summer, with around 40 residents.

The Island is not only beautiful but it is rich in history too. ‘Antikythera is a treasure trove of archaeological sites and spectacular finds,’ reads its website. ‘In 1900 sponge-divers discovered a Roman shipwreck (circa 60 BC) that contained amazingly preserved pieces and the almost intact ‘Antikythera Mechanism’ reputed to be the world’s first analog computer. Aside from its historical importance, the mechanism has inspired many writers and film-makers.’

Full of unspoiled gems, the laid-back island is described as a ‘back-to-basics’ destination for ‘eco-travellers’ so don’t expect any glamour.