An equal share of chores in a relationship leads to a better sex life

We all know it can be hard to keep bedroom matters fresh and ahem, spicy, when you’re in a long-term relationship, but it turns out it might have less to do with what’s happening in the bed as what’s happening outside of it.

A new study has revealed that couples who have an equal relationship in terms of domestic duties experience a better sex life.

couple in bed
Getty Images

Anecdotally, many would confirm this to be true. When you’re the one who’s cooked dinner, washed up the dishes, put the bins out, changed the sheets and got the kids’ lunches ready for the next day, it can be hard to muster the enthusiasm to look at your partner with those come hither eyes you perfected in the first months of your relationship.

But now a scientific study has confirmed the role that relationship equity plays in female sexual desire is perhaps even more integral than we thought.

couple in bed
Getty Images

Conducted by the Centre for Mental Health at Swinburne University of Technology, the study of 299 Australian women aged between 18 to 39 – all of whom were in relationships – asked participants to complete an online questionnaire that measured relationship factors against dimensions of sexual desire. Essentially, recording how equal they perceive their relationship to be and how good their sex life is.

The result? ‘As expected, equality in relationships predicted relationship satisfaction, which, subsequently, was related to higher levels of dyadic sexual desire,’ the report reads.

couple in bed
Getty Images

Female desire is considered to consist of two main factors: solitary and dyadic sexual desire. Solitary sexual desire is defined as the internally driven desire to satisfy specific sexual needs or sexual frustration; dyadic sexual desire is the desire for emotional closeness or intimacy with another person.

So while a fairer relationship that sees things such as chores more evenly divvied up between two partners increases levels of dyadic sexual desire, it had no affect on solitary sexual desire.

Nevertheless, it proves that female sexual desire is something that can be improved on by both parties in a relationship and doing so starts outside of the bedroom. Time to snap on those washing up gloves!