Edible gifts: Hazelnut liqueur chocolate truffles recipe

Gorgeously nutty and hard to resist, these truffles are best stored in the fridge until ready to serve. You can use your favourite liqueur: amaretto, Baileys or even a spiced rum all work really well.

truffles
Ellis Parrinder

MAKES ABOUT 25

200g dark chocolate (55%-70% cocoa, see tip below)
150ml double cream
2 1⁄2 tbsp hazelnut liqueur (such as Frangelico)
1 tbsp softened unsalted butter
1 tbsp crème fraîche
3 tbsp cocoa powder
3 tbsp chopped toasted hazelnuts

  1. Line a loaf tin or shallow container with clingfilm. Chop the chocolate as finely as you can.
  2. Heat the cream in a medium saucepan until just steaming. Add a pinch of salt and the liqueur, then tip in the chocolate. Gently stir together to melt the chocolate and combine with the cream. Stir in the butter then the crème fraîche until just combined, then pour into the container. Set aside to cool to room temperature, then chill for at least 2 hours.
  3. Use a teaspoon measure to scoop up heaped balls of the chocolate truffle mixture and roll them in your hands to balls. Place on a parchment-lined baking sheet and chill for 30 minutes, or pop in the freezer for 10 minutes.
  4. Sift the cocoa powder on to a small plate. Whiz the hazelnuts briefly in a small food processor to a fine crumb, then tip on to a second plate. Roll half of the truffles in the cocoa and half in the ground hazelnuts, ensuring they are coated all over. Chill until ready to give as a gift or to serve. They are best stored in the fridge and will keep for up to one week.

TIP The higher the cocoa solids in your chocolate the less sweet and more intensely chocolatey your truffles will be. You can use 100g chocolate with 55% cocoa solids and 100g chocolate with 70% cocoa solids as a good balance. You can also use a chocolate that has chopped hazelnuts in it, such as Lindt Excellence Roasted Hazelnut.

Food styling: Sarah Hardy. Prop styling: Max Robinson