Boots will now let you return make-up even if it’s been opened

Boots has introduced a new make-up returns policy that allows you to exchange your purchase if you get it home and find that it’s the wrong shade.

As an essential retailer, Boot stores have been open throughout the pandemic, but only for purchases such as medicine and hygiene products. More recently, as restrictions began to ease, it reopened its beauty halls, with special safety measures introduced to keep both customers and staff as safe as possible.

Boots make-up exchange
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One of these changes is the removal of testers, which, while a crucial measure to prevent cross contamination, has left shoppers feeling less confident when it comes to trying a new product, or even replacing an existing one if they’re not sure of the name.

While their in-store beauty consultants are still on hand to offer recommendations, and you can even now have a virtual consultation if you’re not able to make it into a store, Boots understands that not every make-up buy will be the perfect pick first time around. The new Make-Up Exchange Promise will allow you to bring the item back and exchange it for another – even if you’ve already opened it up.

Boots Beauty Halls Coronavirus
Boots

Joanna Rogers, Boots UK Beauty Director said: ‘With our new store safety measures in place, for the time being, testers are no longer available in Boots Beauty Halls and customers have told us they feel less confident buying the right shade.

‘We know how frustrating and disappointing it feels when you get home only to find your new foundation isn’t the right skin tone match, or your new lipstick isn’t the colour you wanted, so we’re now giving people 35 days to exchange their beauty buys even if the packaging has been opened.’

If, like us, you’re wondering what happens to the tube, bullet or bottle you’ve already used, Boots says that it will endeavour to reuse or recycle these products in the most responsible way possible.

boots make-up returns
Alamy Stock Photo

‘For returned items that are not suitable for re-sale; for example, they have been opened, much of this stock is sent back directly to the suppliers. Disposing of items is always a last resort and we continue to explore new, environmentally friendly ways that we can manage this,’ a spokesperson tells you.co.uk.

‘We will always review whether we can re-sell stock to colleagues or gift it to charity. If there is no other option and we have to dispose of an item, our preferred method is a process called energy recovery. This is when non-recyclable materials are converted into usable forms of energy such as electricity or heat.’